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***With a House Government Oversight Committee hearing coming up on Tuesday regarding the Black Lives Matter At School Week of Action hosted by the Ames district, we wanted to refresh everyone on what happened.***

Radley Risner, the son of Ames superintendent Jenny Risner, contacted The Iowa Standard via email on Jan. 26 asking us to stop writing about the Black Lives Matter At School Week of Action.

“The comments by Jacob Hall posted on your page are excessive and not an accurate representation of what the Ames community believes,” he wrote. “You should take a long look at what you publish before doing so because your website’s views are far from reality and comical at best.”

Radley, a college student, said many more people spoke out in favor of the BLM Week of Action than those who spoke against it.

That’s true, but most of those who spoke in support were educators in the district themselves or related to educators in the district.

And, to be honest, we’re not interested in justifying idiocy such as promoting the principles of Black Lives Matter in the public school classroom.

We did publish some of the comments made by those who spoke in support anyway, to be fair, but had no interest in offering up the same, worn-out, regurgitated claims of “racism” and “bigotry” that were so often tossed around by those who celebrate “diversity,” “tolerance” and “acceptance.”

“Do everyone a favor,” Radley suggested. “Discontinue the page before spreading more hateful and false information.”

Now, Radley did not identify himself as the son of the Ames superintendent, but the last name was a sort of tell.

We wrote back to Radley and let him know that his mom was sent an email of 10 questions where she was welcome to provide her views, but she elected not to answer them.

While the Left oftentimes portrays themselves as a group interested in the diversity of thought, acceptance of other opinions and dialogue, Radley said he hopes his mom doesn’t answer the questions.

“All your (sic) doing is trying to cause problems and everyone sees it,” he said.

After some back and forth, Radley said he’d never dream of discussing these issues further as I had proven to be unreasonable and biased with my “continuously inaccurate opinions.”

He then continued the back and forth.

“Attempting to use religion to further your point on the matter with me only proves the type of person you are as well,” he wrote. “Your attempts to use religious beliefs are unfair, unnecessary and inaccurate.”

He asked that readers of The Iowa Standard direct their comments somewhere other than the superintendent.

Later, Radley said The Iowa Standard is “unnecessarily targeting” individuals.

I explained to Radley that I’d prefer the Ames board and superintendent stop abusing innocent children, which would give me nothing else to write about.

A few emails after saying he’d never dream of discussing these issues further, Radley responded:

“I take a little pleasure in knowing you have to go to bed at night with all of the hate you have while still basing the majority of your arguments on the Bible,” he wrote. “You’re really a terrible person.”

It doesn’t seem the same virtues of diversity, tolerance and inclusion are being extended to those who oppose the Black Lives Matter At School Week of Action.

Weird how that seems to be a one-way street.

Author: Jacob Hall