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When students return this fall, they’ll all have the opportunity to recite the Pledge of Allegiance every day thanks to a new Iowa law. But not everyone is excited about the opportunity.

Some are expressing concern about the Pledge of Allegiance on social media.

“We are trying to make some changes to the policy,” Robert Benesh wrote. “We can’t get rid of it obviously but we want to make student choice the focus and at least improve understanding and acceptance of why people might not say it.”

Jewels Marie said as a parent she is making it “crystal clear” to her son that he will not be pledging allegiance.

“I don’t do the pledge,” she wrote. “Haven’t since I realized we are in endless wars as a teen and have added reasons since. As a teacher, I’d take a stand if they tried to require me to do it.”

Benesh wrote that he has to “compromise” in some way since he is not in charge and the law will require districts to offer the Pledge of Allegiance every day.

Lisa Schleicher said she is curious as to why kids in a public school should have to pledge allegiance to anything.

“The psychology behind something like that contradicts what school is about and the critical thinking so many are trying to accomplish,” she wrote. “Making and/or brainwashing a child to say something they don’t believe in has got to be a problem, right?”

Heather Berkenpas said the pledge is clearly written in reference to the Christian version of God.

“It’s the one nation under GOD that gets me,” she wrote. That’s not exactly as relevant today for a large portion of the country.”

Berkenpas said she thinks of terrorists pledging allegiance to “whatever group they are part of.”

“I’m sure Covid Kim will find a way to pass some law about having to say this,” she wrote.

Nadea Lloyd said no, no, no!

“How about you teach our children our real history and then let them decide for themselves if they still support this BS!”

Melissa Martin, a teacher in the Des Moines Public Schools according to her Facebook page, said both issues — masking and the pledge — are example that systemic racism is “alive and thriving in America.”

Meredith Hamlyn said pledging allegiance to a flag that states we are a country where all are equal is teaching children to “gaslight themselves” into believing one thing when “our country has not fixed systemic racism in our education system for one.”

Kaycee Schippers said the Republicans passed the law not because they believe in the men and women who protect the country, but “as a political stunt to try to show their supporters that they are ‘patriots’ and that Democrats are not.”

“They are INTENTIONALLY trying to divide the people of Iowa,” she wrote. “All in the name of getting reelected. No one needs to FORCE or coerce people in Iowa to say the Pledge and anyone who thinks so is completely ignorant. This is nothing but a BS political stunt that makes me sick to my stomach, and it should make you sick too. Open your eyes.”

Democrat State Rep. Molly Donahue said it is just one time per day, but nobody has to actually stand up or do it.

“I think they could display the flag on the whiteboard while a pre-recorded pledge is read over the intercom and not purchase (a flag) for every classroom,” she wrote.

Rachel Carney, a science teacher at Clear Creek Amana, said:

“I just don’t have words anymore. I feel completely hopeless.”