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It is perhaps the most under-reported story of significance in 2021 — and perhaps of our century so far. There is an election audit taking place in Maricopa County in Arizona. It is not dominating the headlines on major media outlets, but it should be.

And the most obvious question that should be asked is…if the Democrats did not cheat, what are they worried about?

Joe Biden’s DOJ is shoving back against the audit. The principal deputy assistant attorney general, Pamela Karlan, said the process is “intimidation of voters.” Intimidating voters who already voted? That’s clever.

A judge issued an order instructing the county to turn over all routers, tabulators or some combinations thereof to garner the system logs. But Maricopa County is refusing, claiming a security risk to medical data and law enforcement records.

Obviously giving the federal government under Biden control of the audit will bury any hope of the truth coming forward.

Florida, Georgia and Texas have all worked to pass legislation addressing election reforms.

Democrats at the federal level are attempting to circumvent state laws by federalizing elections with H.R. 1. Congresswoman Claudia Tenney called H.R. 1 a “recipe for disaster.”

It is important Americans contact their U.S. Senators and encourage them to stand against S. 1.

The U.S. Senate Rules and Administration Committee is scheduled to vote on H.R. 1 (now known as S. 1) tomorrow. The vote could push the bill to the Senate floor.

 

Author: Jacob Hall