***The Iowa Standard is an independent media voice. We rely on grassroots financial supporters to exist. If you appreciate what we do, please consider a one-time sign of support or becoming a monthly supporter (even just $5/month would go a long way in sustaining us!) We also offer advertising options for advocacy groups, events and businesses! If you’ve ever used the phrase “Fake News Media” — this is YOUR chance to do something about it! You can also support us on PayPal at newsdesk[email protected] or Venmo at Iowa-Standard-2018 or through the mail at: PO Box 112 Sioux Center, IA 51250 Thank you so much for your support and please invite your friends and family to like us on Facebook, sign up for our email newsletter and visit our website!***

I get the argument that the government shouldn’t do anything in terms of providing “relief” for American citizens. Our nation has incredible debt. We can’t look to the government as the answer, even in times of crisis.

If government wants to help, they should simply get out of the way. Open things up. Quit with the power grab and let adults be adults.

But that isn’t the government we have.

Our government passed a bill a couple of days ago to “help” struggling Americans. Now, those Americans who are struggling are largely struggling because the government forced their place of work to close, scared people out of their minds and have enjoyed “power” like never before in 2020.

It isn’t the fault of Americans — well, except that we are the ones who elected these people.

All that said, I understand the concept of $0 in relief for American citizens.

But our government decided it had to do something. It needed to do something.

And it chose to give each American $600.

Six hundred dollars.

I don’t mean to sound like Nancy Pelosi and talk about bread crumbs. Six hundred dollars to almost every American adds up in a hurry.

But if it is meant to help soften the blow of the government shutdowns amid the pandemic, it won’t do the trick.

Essentially, the $600 stimulus payment is the government acknowledging that it believes it should do something, but not wanting to do something that will actually help the average, everyday American.

Again, on principle, I more than understand (and could easily get behind) the idea that the government shouldn’t be in the business of handing out money.

But since government decided to do something, it probably should’ve tried to find a way to make more of an impact for average, everyday folks.

On this issue, ironically, President Donald J. Trump agrees with Sen. Chuck Schumer, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, The Squad and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

What a strange, fitting political ending to 2020.

Author: Jacob Hall